Rosemary Brooks spent seven years at Lockheed, but was interested in joining a company where they could take on more of a “customer-driven” role. Brooks’ healthy appetite for risk, they want to make an impact, and the growing number of opportunities in the technology they put on this sector. In 1995, she joined Formtek. During the next five years, Brooks worked for three small technology companies. In 2000, Brooks was tired and ready for a break. She took two years to spend time with her son. After … Read more »

Rosemary Brooks spent seven years at Lockheed, but was interested in joining a company where they could take on more of a “customer-driven” role. Brooks’ healthy appetite for risk, they want to make an impact, and the growing number of opportunities in the technology they put on this sector. In 1995, she joined Formtek. During the next five years, Brooks worked for three small technology companies. In 2000, Brooks was tired and ready for a break. She took two years to spend time with her son. After a two year break, Brooks heard about the opportunity at a start-up called China Blue. Richard Wong founded the company in 2000 with the intention of bringing Shanghai style consumer products in the United States on a luxury lifestyle brand. Wong said Brooks, a partnership with him and become the CEO of the company. Brooks uses four questions to assess the opportunity China Blue. They first examined how well match their skills with the opportunity: were the economics of the business model sound? What were the immediate financing needs of the company? How good and Brooks / Wong partnership would work?
«Hide

from
Garth Saloner,
Aisa Aiyer,
Carly Irestone,
Alexander Tauber
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
4 pages.
Publication Date: Sep 12, in 2005. Prod #: E206-PDF-ENG
Rosemary Brooks HBR case solution

[related_post themes="flat"]