In 2002, a handful of entrepreneurs began to drugs from Canada into the United States dispatched, taking advantage of regulatory and price differentials in the neighboring countries. With the internet and a low-cost network of Canadian pharmacies, companies such as Rx Depot U.S. customers order their prescription drugs in the United States allowed to buy them at a substantial discount from the current U.S. prices, and deliver the drugs directly into their homeland. It was a powerful business … Read more »

In 2002, a handful of entrepreneurs began to drugs from Canada into the United States dispatched, taking advantage of regulatory and price differentials in the neighboring countries. With the internet and a low-cost network of Canadian pharmacies, companies such as Rx Depot U.S. customers order their prescription drugs in the United States allowed to buy them at a substantial discount from the current U.S. prices, and deliver the drugs directly into their homeland. It was made a prominent player a strong business model that Rx Depot. In November 2003, however, possessed a U.S. court that Rx Depot violated federal law. The company was forced to close, but its founder, Carl Moore, announced that he was ready to fight. Rx Depot has just breech U.S. intellectual property laws? Or have his actions suggest that the laws were ready for change?
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Adam day
Debora L. Spar
Source: Harvard Business School
14 pages.
Release Date: 03 February, 2005. Prod #: 705010-PDF-ENG
Rx Depot: Importing drugs from Canada HBR case solution

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