Once known as Asia’s most important economic city, by 2003, Shanghai had emerged as a vibrant and vital city again. It had become the leading center of commerce, finance and transport in the People’s Republic of China, and a large production center. A wealth of results of the Shanghai newfound was a fast growing real estate market. Shanghai real estate market had gone through booms and busts in the 1990s and by 2003 was in the middle of another upswing. But by the end of 2003 some anal … Read more »

Once known as Asia’s most important economic city, by 2003, Shanghai had emerged as a vibrant and vital city again. It had become the leading center of commerce, finance and transport in the People’s Republic of China, and a large production center. A wealth of results of the Shanghai newfound was a fast growing real estate market. Shanghai real estate market had gone through booms and busts in the 1990s and by 2003 was in the middle of another upswing. But by the end of 2003, some analysts worried that the real estate market was overheated and that a “bubble” may have been in sight. As the largest group of nonmainland Chinese investors in the Shanghai property market, Hong Kong-based developers were responsible for some of the most ambitious developments in the city. Several of these developers, including some with massive projects underway were always wary of conditions in the Shanghai market. The questions that were in them, how the market would develop and how they can best position themselves for the future.
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from
Michael J. Enright,
Vincent Mak
Source: University of Hong Kong
32 pages.
Release Date: 24, May 2004. Prod #: HKU326-PDF-ENG
Shanghai property market and Hong Kong developers HBR case solution

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