In early 2009, Andrew Sears, executive director of TechMission, a Christian social service nonprofit, was known from a challenge that many not-for-profit organizations, as a sustainable organization, especially in an environment where donations to charity had refused to develop. With limited resources and a growing portfolio of programs, he had three competing factors within TechMission balance: staying true to its Christian principles, maintaining its credibility in urban communities, and ourselves … Read more »

In early 2009, Andrew Sears, executive director of TechMission, a Christian social service nonprofit, was known from a challenge that many not-for-profit organizations, as a sustainable organization, especially in an environment where donations to charity had refused to develop. With limited resources and a growing portfolio of programs, he had three competing factors within TechMission balance: staying true to its Christian principles, maintaining its credibility in urban communities and the use of technology as a driver for the promotion of social justice. Various initiatives presented various ways for potential growth. And to determine the correct path, knew that Sears either way would raise additional funds which may from secular organizations. The challenge was to secure these funds in a tightening market and then the allocation of the initiatives that had the most potential. In addition, it would be necessary to ensure that all initiatives had the right programs to progress the people and funding.
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from
Susan F. Sieloff,
Robert Young,
Raymond M. Kinnunen
Source: North American Case Research Association (NACRA)
19 pages.
Release Date: 15, March 2010. Prod #: NA0036-PDF-ENG
TechMission: Jesus, Justice and Technology HBR case solution