Examines the tensions multinationals cause by focusing on Europe’s response to the growing U.S. company investments in the 20th Century. First Europeans but rarely voltages over time felt threatened by the U.S. investment grew. After the Second World War there was a great political and cultural storm over the “Coca-Colonization” of France. Has published its name from the often cited book by Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, 1967, which symbolizes the ambivalent feelings of many Eu … Read more »

Examines the tensions multinationals cause by focusing on Europe’s response to the growing U.S. company investments in the 20th Century. First Europeans but rarely voltages over time felt threatened by the U.S. investment grew. After the Second World War there was a great political and cultural storm over the “Coca-Colonization” of France. Has published its name from the often cited book by Jean-Jacques Servan-Schreiber, 1967, which symbolizes the ambivalent feelings of many Europeans towards U.S. investment bank. In other countries, the U.S. management practices aroused antagonism.
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from
Geoffrey G. Jones,
Meghan Gallagher core Stine M
Source: Harvard Business School
14 pages.
Publication Date: Sep 19, 2003. Prod #: 804 057-HCB-ENG
“The American Challenge:” Europe’s Response to American Business HBR case solution