The continuation (1740.1) describes the emergence of a high-profile public called lobbying Save AmeriCorps. It details to convince the full-court press effort, including the use of national and local media, political contacts of board members, and a series of public events meant to Congressional appropriators which include an emergency supplementary budget, the additional funding for AmeriCorps grants would approve. Finally, the fact that the coalition efforts fall short, at least in the near future, rai … Read more »

The continuation (1740.1) describes the emergence of a high-profile public called lobbying Save AmeriCorps. It details to convince the full-court press effort, including the use of national and local media, political contacts of board members, and a series of public events meant to Congressional appropriators which include an emergency supplementary budget, the additional funding for AmeriCorps grants would approve. Finally, the fact that raises the coalition’s efforts fall short, at least in the near future, questions about the long-term effects of such lobbying as well as the more fundamental question of whether it makes sense for volunteers and nonprofit organizations to see the government for salaries and operational funds. HKS case number 1,740.1
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Howard Husock,
Mark H. Moore
17 pages.
Release date: 01 March 2004. Prod #: HKS478-PDF-ENG
The AmeriCorps Budget Crisis of 2003 (Sequel): Why the National Service Movement Given cuts and how they responded HBR case solution

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