As Brazil’s energetic but fractious democracy emerged in the 1990s launched the Ethos Institute, a movement for corporate social responsibility (CSR), which it hoped would flatter both the private sector to manage their own operations responsibly, such as waiver of racism and to protect the environment and Brazil lead to a just and sustainable society. By 2007, CSR ethic had a prominent national movement that had helped strengthen enforcement of some laws such as the transformed pr … Read more »

As Brazil’s energetic but fractious democracy emerged in the 1990s launched the Ethos Institute, a movement for corporate social responsibility (CSR), which it hoped would flatter both the private sector to manage their own operations responsibly, such as waiver of racism and to protect the environment and Brazil lead to a just and sustainable society. By 2007, CSR ethic had a prominent national movement that had helped strengthen enforcement of some laws such as the prohibition of child labor converted. Two cases say Ethos’ history. The first (A) here describes the social context of the Brazilian private sector ambiguous legacy embossed genuine community conscience, nor cooperation with authoritarian regimes and the question arises as Ethos’ leader, their relationships with industry. How could it best to foster the idea that companies had a moral obligation to society? How could they secure marshal influence on compliance CSR standards? How should they define corporate social responsibility? HKS case number 1880.1
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Jonathan Sclefer,
Mark H. Moore
3 pages.
Release date: 05 Begin May 2009. Prod #: HKS461-PDF-ENG
The Ethos Institute (B): promise and risks of cooperation with the government, Sequel HBR case solution

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