Despite its reputation as a bastion of the free market, Hong Kong has long been the home of a well-developed, state-sponsored “social sector.” Although many non-governmental social institutions began as a purely private and nonprofit, the Government during the 1980s and 1990s, began an increasing share of their budgets to pay by payments known as “subsidies.” In the mid-1990s, however, the leaders of non-profit social organizations are increasingly concerned … Read more »

Despite its reputation as a bastion of the free market, Hong Kong has long been the home of a well-developed, state-sponsored “social sector.” Although many non-governmental social institutions began as a purely private and nonprofit, the Government during the 1980s and 1990s, began an increasing share of their budgets to pay by payments known as “subsidies.” In the mid-1990s, however, the leaders of non-profit social organizations are increasingly concerned that the conditions under which their organizations receive public assistance, including salary scales, job descriptions and staffing by the sentence allows enough flexibility in the management of the government. This case describes the development of a replacement “subsidy” system, instead of providing support for certain items and supplies, instead, would divide the social services nonprofits with “lump sum” Scholarship pot, which would be a single NGO managers. The case details the complexity of planning and implementation of such a change, which, inter alia, on the transitional arrangements required to ensure continuity of services and workforce least interference. The government must deal specifically with the fear of senior social worker that the new system give managers an incentive to replace them with new, younger hires. It also allows for the discussion of specific dilemmas in Hong Kong faced, the case can be a starting point for a general discussion of the variety of possible relationships between the public and non-profit sector and how such arrangements are, as a practical matter is, . HKS CERTIFICATE 1630.0
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from
Howard Husock,
Herman Leonard
26 pages.
Release Date: 1 October 2001. Prod #: HKS225-PDF-ENG
The lump sum grant initiative for Hong Kong Social Services HBR case solution