In 2010, for the first time in 23 years, PepsiCo has not invest in Super Bowl advertising for its iconic brand. Instead, the company has $ 20 million diverted the social media-fueled Pepsi Refresh Project: PepsiCo innovative cause-marketing program in which consumers submitted ideas for grants for health, environmental, social, educational and cultural causes. Consumers chose their favorite ideas and PepsiCo funded the winners in the form of grants ranging from $ 5,000 to $ 250,000. The case highlights … Read more »

In 2010, for the first time in 23 years, PepsiCo has not invest in Super Bowl advertising for its iconic brand. Instead, the company has $ 20 million diverted the social media-fueled Pepsi Refresh Project: PepsiCo innovative cause-marketing program in which consumers submitted ideas for grants for health, environmental, social, educational and cultural causes. Consumers chose their favorite ideas and PepsiCo funded the winners in the form of grants ranging from $ 5,000 to $ 250,000. The case highlights the benefits and risks of traditional branding and social media branding, including a discussion of how the Pepsi Refresh Project fits with previous Pepsi brand positioning. The case discussion focuses on the brand team should have the initiative to evaluate return on investment (from sales to social media engagement) whether to continue the initiative in 2011, and whether Pepsi is the right brand for this type of initiative.

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from
Michael I. Norton,
Jill Avery
Source: Harvard Business School
24 pages.
Release Date: 20, September 2011. Prod #: 512018-PDF-ENG
The Pepsi Refresh Project: A Thirst for Change HBR case solution

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