In 2007, announced under the leadership of CEO Stuart Rose, the legendary British retailer Marks and Spencer with great fanfare, his “Plan A” initiative. Based on the five key pillars of climate change, waste, sustainable materials, fair partner and health, sought the company’s plan to transform practices. By 2012, the program has the objective of ensuring that M & S was carbon neutral, sending no waste to landfill. Should also help its customers and employees achieve a healthier lifestyle … Read more »

In 2007, announced under the leadership of CEO Stuart Rose, the legendary British retailer Marks and Spencer with great fanfare, his “Plan A” initiative. Based on the five key pillars of climate change, waste, sustainable materials, fair partner and health, sought the company’s plan to transform practices. By 2012, the program has the objective of ensuring that M & S was carbon neutral, sending no waste to landfill. Should also help its customers and employees achieve a healthier lifestyle and improve all involved with fair wages and better working hours and conditions of life in the company supply chain. Called Plan A “because there is no Plan B,” the company identified 180 projects to improve the sustainability of their operations and business practices in anticipation of the need for a completely different business model in the future. Focus of Plan A includes sustainable procurement and influence on the business practices of the company supply chain, communication with employees, customers and investors, and employee engagement. The case closes with the compromises in deciding whether or not refrigerator doors in the grocery section of its stores install involved. While the energy savings and the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions are relatively clear and easy to measure the impact on customers and sales are more difficult to assess.
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from
Robert G. Eccles,
George Serafeim,
Kyle Armbrester
Source: Harvard Business School
16 pages.
Release Date: 23 January 2012. Prod #: 112062-PDF-ENG
Tough Decisions at Marks and Spencer HBR case solution

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