On 1 May 1992 is Doug Friesen, manager of assembly for Toyota Georgetown, Kentucky plant, a problem with the seats installed in the facility single product – Camrys. A growing number of cars are sitting off-line with defective seats or completely lacking. This is one of several causes of the recent extension, but neither the cause of the problem nor a solution is readily apparent. Since the plant is a prime example of the famous Toyota Production System (TPS), it is determined that Friesen, … Read more »

On 1 May 1992 is Doug Friesen, manager of assembly for Toyota Georgetown, Kentucky plant, a problem with the seats installed in the facility single product – Camrys. A growing number of cars are sitting off-line with defective seats or completely lacking. This is one of several causes of the recent extension, but neither the cause of the problem nor a solution is readily apparent. Since the plant is a prime example of the famous Toyota Production System (TPS), it is determined that Friesen, if possible, the situation is resolved using TPS principles and tools are. Students are asked to suggest what action (s) should Friesen and analyze whether the current Georgetown handling of the seat problem fits within the TPS philosophy.
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Kazuhiro Mishina
Source: HBS Premier Case Collection
22 pages.
Release Date: 08 September, 1992. Prod #: 693019-PDF-ENG
Toyota Motor Manufacturing, USA, Inc. HBR case solution