Faced in the fall of 2009, Toyota Motor Corporation, once revered for its commitment to quality and reliability, a highly publicized series of recalls in the United States, accounting for about a year’s worth of sales in one of the most important markets. During the first Toyota recall but was still met with widespread disbelief support for the brand, and subsequent revelations reminds tested the resilience brand in the U.S. The company’s first public response to the problems – a mixtu … Read more »

Faced in the fall of 2009, Toyota Motor Corporation, once revered for its commitment to quality and reliability, a highly publicized series of recalls in the United States, accounting for about a year’s worth of sales in one of the most important markets. During the first Toyota recall support for the brand, subsequent revelations was the widespread disbelief but still hit and reminds tested the brand strength in the U.S. The company’s first public response to the problems – a mixture of silence by top executives and vague, misleading public statements – frustrated U.S. government and the public. Only weeks after the news first broke, Toyota has to organize a clear message back to its commitment to quality. Late February 2010, Toyota President Akio Toyoda reluctantly accepted an invitation to the U.S. Congress to testify, 148 days after the first recall announcement. He has to decide what to say.
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from
John A. Quelch,
Carin-Isabel Knoop,
Ryan Johnson
Source: Harvard Business School
27 pages.
Publication Date: Oct 19, 2010. Prod #: 511016-PDF-ENG
Toyota Recalls (A): Hitting the skids HBR case solution