In 2012, China reached a historic milestone in the development of more Chinese citizens living in cities than in the countryside. China’s rapid urbanization and the consequent conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes, raised a number of economic, social and political concerns. China could maintain their food security in the face of rising demand for land for urban development? How could the sustainability of local government finances? Was the growing number of lan … Read more »

In 2012, China reached a historic milestone in the development of more Chinese citizens living in cities than in the countryside. China’s rapid urbanization and the consequent conversion of agricultural land for non-agricultural purposes, raised a number of economic, social and political concerns. China could maintain their food security in the face of rising demand for land for urban development? How could the sustainability of local government finances? Was the growing number of rural protests a harbinger of great changes in China’s political institutions? How would the challenges of urbanization on the environment for private companies? The success and profitability of China’s overall growth strategy depended crucially on the management of a successful urban transition.
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from
Lakshmi Iyer,
G.A. Donovan
Source: Harvard Business School
23 pages.
Release date: 30 October 2012. Prod #: 713 037 PDF-ENG
China urbanization HBR case solution

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