While uncertainty is ubiquitous in today’s economy, the authors argue that one thing is clear: public policy to increase innovation, is usually not working, and this is essentially a confusion of the terms “invention” and “innovation”. While the terms are often used interchangeably, there are important differences in meaning, purpose and method. They describe these differences and argue that the focus must switch to a particular type of innovation: user-driven innovation. This type of i … Read more »

While uncertainty is ubiquitous in today’s economy, the authors argue that one thing is clear: public policy to increase innovation, is usually not working, and this is essentially a confusion of the terms “invention” and “innovation”. While the terms are often used interchangeably, there are important differences in meaning, purpose and method. They describe these differences and argue that the focus must switch to a particular type of innovation: user-driven innovation. This type of innovation allows users to something that they have not done before and can do well as lower costs for users. They explain how to ‘refresh’ user driven innovation policy innovation, to put an end inventors creating inventions that no one really wants to embrace.
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from
Roger Martin,
James Milway
Source: Rotman School of Management
5 pages.
Release Date: 1 September 2012. Prod #: ROT175-PDF-ENG
User-Driven Innovation: to put an end to invent in the Dark HBR case solution

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