In 1996, WESCO, a national distributor of electrical equipment and supplies, a growth of 6 percent to 8 percent in sales and 12 to 16 percent of the mapped profitability over the next five years. The heart of this growth strategy is the National Accounts (SNA) program, which was designed to serve WESCO its large industrial customers in response to recent changes they made to their business processes. However, in June 1997, the NA program has not achieved the expected results. WESCO now ne … Read more »

In 1996, WESCO, a national distributor of electrical equipment and supplies, a growth of 6 percent to 8 percent in sales and 12 to 16 percent of the mapped profitability over the next five years. The heart of this growth strategy is the National Accounts (SNA) program, which was designed to serve WESCO its large industrial customers in response to recent changes they made to their business processes. However, in June 1997, the NA program has not achieved the expected results. WESCO now needs to isolate the cause of the NA program shortfall and implementation of changes that this program back on track. It must decide whether to continue to be proactive or passive in the initiation, development and maintenance of national accounts and offer the NA program only after customers have shown a legitimate interest.
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The Narayandas
Source: Harvard Business School
28 pages.
Publication Date: Nov 10, 1997. Prod #: 598 021 PDF-ENG
WESCO Distribution, Inc. HBR case solution

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