Describes the development of WorldSpace, the world’s first major provider of digital radio service to the Third World. The idea of ​​Noah Samara, an African-born, American jurist, has a double WorldSpace commercial and social mission. Samara wants the problem of development by addressing “information wealth” to people in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In particular, it aims to provide high-quality news, entertainment, education and content transmitted over a low … Read more »

Describes the development of WorldSpace, the world’s first major provider of digital radio service to the Third World. The idea of ​​Noah Samara, an African-born, American jurist, has a double WorldSpace commercial and social mission. Samara wants the problem of development by addressing “information wealth” to people in Africa, Asia and Latin America. In particular, he wants to make high-quality broadcast news, entertainment, education and content over a low-cost digital radio system. In less than a decade Samara has achieved much: He has raised over $ 1 billion for the project, acquired the rights to a broad swath of the world’s digital frequency usage and launched two proprietary satellite. The question now is, he can combine his social goals with a for-profit mission? And the people of Africa, Asia and Latin America will want what WorldSpace sold?
This case is only available in printed form (HBP no digital distribution rights to the content) are available. As a result, a digital copy of the Educator case via this website is not available.
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Allison Morhaime,
Bhavesh Patel T.,
Debora L. Spar
Source: Harvard Business School
26 pages.
Publication Date: Jun 28, 2002. Prod #: 702 034-HCB-ENG
WorldSpace: Digital Radio for the Third World HBR case solution

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