In February 2010, Ursula Burns CEO of Norwalk, Connecticut-based Xerox Corporation wrapped up their first big move, just seven months after ascending to the top. Xerox document technology, software, services and supplies company, acquired in business process outsourcing (BPO) and IT services Dallas-based Affiliated Computer Services (ACS), a global enterprise. The acquisition represents a bold step by Xerox in business process outsourcing, and the latest atte … Read more »

In February 2010, Ursula Burns CEO of Norwalk, Connecticut-based Xerox Corporation wrapped up their first big move, just seven months after ascending to the top. Xerox document technology, software, services and supplies company, acquired in business process outsourcing (BPO) and IT services Dallas-based Affiliated Computer Services (ACS), a global enterprise. The acquisition represents a bold step by Xerox in business process outsourcing, and the latest attempt by a manufacturer of Xerox office equipment to transform into a provider of business services. Burns argues that, when she and her team could successfully combine Xerox and ACS, the company could reach $ 100 million in synergies in the first year, with significant future growth prospects. External observers and analysts would, however, difficult to convince, though, as many argued that Xerox faced a tough fight. This case examines the reasons for Xerox acquisition of ACS and fires as planned, their vision of growth and expansion of a company known for reach, but limited somewhat by its research and technology functions.
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from
Jesper Sorensen,
Victoria Chang
Source: Stanford Graduate School of Business
33 pages.
Publication Date: Aug 30, 2010. Prod #: SM187-PDF-ENG
Xerox and Affiliated Computer Services (ACS) HBR case solution

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